Max is a

peristaltic filtration system in the river of time

Finishing a Game

makegames:

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As I work towards completing my own game, I’ve been thinking a lot about finishing projects in general. I’ve noticed that there are a lot of talented developers out there that have trouble finishing games. Truthfully, I’ve left a long trail of unfinished games in my wake… I think everyone has. Not every project is going to pan out, for whatever reason. But if you find yourself consistently backing out of game projects that have a lot of potential, it could be worth taking a step back and examining why this happens.

We’ve all had that feeling about at least one game, comic book, movie, etc., that comes out: “Gee, I could do better than this! This is overrated.” But it’s important to take a step back and realize that, hey, they put in the time to finish a project and I haven’t. That’s at least one thing they might be better than me at, and it’s probably why they have the recognition I don’t! If you treat finishing like a skill, rather than simply a step in the process, you can acknowledge not only that it’s something you can get better at, but also what habits and thought processes get in your way.

I don’t believe that there’s a right way to make games. It’s a creative endeavor, so there are no hard and fast rules that can’t be broken at some point. But as a game developer who has discussed this problem with other game developers, I feel like there are some mental traps that we all fall into at some point, especially when we’re starting out. Being aware of these traps is a great first step towards finishing something. (Between you and me, codifying these ideas is partly my way of staying on top of them, too!)

So without further ado, here is a list of 15 tips for finishing a game:

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Anonymous asked: Any albums you can recommend listening to for reading Neuromancer? Cause I listened to the Mirror's Edge soundtrack while reading Snow Crash and it worked really well. I gave the Akira soundtrack a try but by the fifth track it gets really trippy and wets the experience a little. thanks

maxscoville:

No shit, at this exact moment, I’m writing notes about what I’d put in an adaptation of “Virtual Light,” and the last note I made was about The Dead Kennedys “California Über Alles.”

For Neuromancer, my main soundtracks were The Prodigy’s “Music For The Jilted Generation” and Future Sound Of London’s “ISDN” and “Dead Cities.” I’m actually listening to the latter as I’m typing this. Tangerine Dream’s “Exit” sets a different tone but it’s way ethereal and atmospheric.

lexxercise:

Some of you may recognize these characters from recent Livestreams, but for those of you who don’t, they’re from Beard the Immortal; a collaborative writing project chronicling the many adventures and exploits of the hulking wall of heroic beef that is Beard (pictured above).

If fantasy adventures are your cup of tea, give it a read! My work on this project is ongoing, so this won’t be the last you see of these three.

theoneaboutscience:

An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), or drone, made by the French company Fly-n-Sense, flies over Mont-de-Marsan, France, on July 12, 2012. French firefighters were testing it in the Landes forest region as an innovative forest surveillance system which will enable a real-time monitoring of fire outbreaks. (Pierre Andriew/AFP/Getty Images) (via Robots at Work and Play - In Focus - The Atlantic)

theoneaboutscience:

An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), or drone, made by the French company Fly-n-Sense, flies over Mont-de-Marsan, France, on July 12, 2012. French firefighters were testing it in the Landes forest region as an innovative forest surveillance system which will enable a real-time monitoring of fire outbreaks. (Pierre Andriew/AFP/Getty Images) (via Robots at Work and Play - In Focus - The Atlantic)